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Thread: Jack Tempchin

  1. #1
    Administrator sodascouts's Avatar
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    Default Jack Tempchin

    A new album from Glenn's long-time collaborator (not to mention contributor to Eagles albums, including LROOE). More info here.

    Always in our hearts, Never forgotten

  2. #2
    Administrator sodascouts's Avatar
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    Default Re: Jack Tempchin

    Tempchin's also doing some shows - one in California. More info here.

    Always in our hearts, Never forgotten

  3. #3

    Default Re: Jack Tempchin

    Thanks for the links, Soda. I'll look out for that on Amazon.


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    Administrator sodascouts's Avatar
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    Default Re: Jack Tempchin

    Another Tempchin show on Dec. 14 in Solona Beach, with Dave Mason. More info here.

    Always in our hearts, Never forgotten

  5. #5
    Administrator sodascouts's Avatar
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    Default Re: Jack Tempchin

    This is a combo Jack Tempchin / JD Souther piece that mentions Glenn:

    From North Country Times

    Their paths first crossed at an open mic in San Diego 3 1/2 decades ago, and both found fleeting fame after separately penning hits for the Eagles. In the years since, they've pursued their own musical paths, mostly existing under the pop culture radar and occasionally turning out a solo album.

    Given that old pals J.D. Souther and Jack Tempchin record only sporadically, what are the odds that both men would issue new albums within a couple of weeks of each other?

    Pretty long odds, said Souther by phone from his home in Nashville, Tenn., where he'd just gotten a copy of Tempchin's new disc, "Songs." Tempchin, who has called Encinitas home for the past 14 years after living his whole life in San Diego proper, also allowed that it was a pretty weird coincidence that Souther's "If the World Was You" had come out right on the heels of his own album.

    As to how they met, Souther (who's in town Dec. 10 for a show at Acoustic Music San Diego) said it was shortly after he had moved to L.A. from his childhood home in west Texas, when he was playing in San Diego regularly with future Eagle Glenn Frey.

    "Glenn and I were down there all the time playing at those clubs ---- the Candy Company and the Heritage, the Belly Up. We played everything down there when we first started, when we were playing for free at open mics.

    "We were all broke, and Jack had a big old house we used to stay in. That's where we know each other from.

    "I think I played more gigs in San Diego that first year than I did in L.A. I think it was a great city ---- I often considered moving down there for sheer quality of life: great Mexican food and the dog-friendliest beach in America."

    Tempchin was born and raised in San Diego, graduating from Crawford High and San Diego State with a degree in psychology.

    But while in college, he fell in love with music and began playing around town.

    "I was living in a garage, so I didn't have very many expenses when I went to college. At that time, they had coffeehouses ---- I worked at several of those doing the hoot nights, being the host when people sit in. That's how I made a living during college."

    It was during this period that he began writing his own songs, performing them on harmonica and vocals.

    "I always wrote my own stuff, because learning other people's songs was quite difficult ---- so I just started making up my own.

    "From the second song I wrote onwards, I would play them in the coffeehouses, and other musicians would ask if they could learn them and play them. A guy named Ted Stock started playing my songs around town and people were saying how great it was, so I asked him to show me how to play it on guitar and he said, 'No way, that's my arrangement.' "

    Souther's introduction to music started at birth.

    "My dad was a big-band crooner; that's what we played in our house. That's what I heard until I started bringing rock 'n' roll and rockabilly home."

    Even though Souther is best known for co-writing country-rock songs with the Eagles ("The Best of My Love," "Heartache Tonight," "New Kid in Town"), Roy Orbison ("Coming Home") and James Taylor ("Her Town Too"), he said the jazz that infuses his new record has been present throughout his career.

    "I've never really been able to distinguish very much between different styles of music having more value than another. I was playing what they used to call pickups or casuals with jazz players in their 30s when I was 14, 15.

    "I always wanted to be a really good band leader; the guys I always admired were guys like Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Stan Kenton."

    And it was the modern jazz of his youth that in large part shaped his musical philosophy, Souther said.

    "Miles Davis, John Coltrane, Gil Evans and the Dave Brubeck Quartet changed my musical outlook."

    For Tempchin, who wrote ("Peaceful Easy Feeling") or co-wrote ("Already Gone") two hits for the Eagles, joining Johnny Rivers' cover of "Slow Dancin'" and lesser-known gems like Glen Campbell's reading of "Rollin' (In My Sweet Baby's Arms)," the collapse of the big-label model of the music business and the rise of the Internet as distribution network has been both blessing and challenge.

    "I think the Internet definitely makes it more democratic. I just finished working with a gal from Korea and a guy from Ireland who flew to Hollywood to work with me last week; they had not met each other other than through MySpace and then Skype."

    And the new record was released on his own label, Night River. Tempchin said he likes the control of owning everything himself, but he admitted that the marketing muscle of the labels in the old days had a certain appeal to musicians.

    "Nowadays, I just put it up for sale on the Internet, and I have a distribution deal so it will be in stores as well. The real challenge is to just somehow have the public have the opportunity to hear it."

    Souther, too, released his new album on his own label ---- and said he likes the way the music business works in the age of the Internet.

    "I'm happy to be in the situation I'm in. I own my own record company, my own publishing, my own masters, and I have a great distribution deal.

    "I get to do what I want ---- I'm perfectly happy to live without the big advance."

    Jack Tempchin

    When: 8 p.m. Dec. 9

    Where: Calypso Cafe, 576 N Coast Highway 101, Leucadia

    Admission: Free (dinner reservations suggested)

    Info: (760) 632-8252 or calypsocafe.net

    Web: tempchin.com

    J.D. Souther

    When: 7:30 p.m. Dec. 10

    Where: Acoustic Music San Diego, 4650 Mansfield St. (Normal Heights United Methodist Church), San Diego

    Tickets: sold out

    Info: (619) 303-8176 or acousticmusicsandiego.com

    Web: jdsouther.net

    Always in our hearts, Never forgotten

  6. #6
    Administrator sodascouts's Avatar
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    Default Re: Jack Tempchin

    Another interview, this time from the San Diego Reader (click link for photo):

    “I’ve lived in San Diego all my life,” says singer-songwriter Jack Tempchin, “and I consider it my city — although I don’t mind sharing it with a few million people.”

    Before writing songs for the Eagles and others, Tempchin lived in Banker’s Hill in 1970-’71. He often performed at a Mission Beach watering hole called the Heritage (where, for a time, Tom Waits manned the door).

    In 1971, Tempchin managed SDSU’s Backdoor theater. While eating lunch one day at Der Wienerschnitzel on Washington and First in Hillcrest, inspired by “two pretty girls walking by,” he began writing the lyrics to “Peaceful Easy Feeling” on the back of a concert flyer. Friend and fellow musician Glenn Frey brought the song to his band the Eagles in 1972. The group recorded Tempchin’s “Already Gone” in 1973.

    Every time the Eagles rerelease either song, Tempchin receives songwriter royalties. The Eagles’ album Their Greatest Hits (1971–1975), featuring both tunes, has sold 27 million copies, making it one of the ten best-selling albums ever, according to the Recording Industry Association of America.
    Tempchin’s songs have been covered by locals the Paladins and Chris Hillman, as well as by George Jones, Glen Campbell, Tanya Tucker, Emmylou Harris, and Trisha Yearwood. Now living in Encinitas, Tempchin recently released a solo CD, Songs, which includes his new version of “Smuggler’s Blues,” cowritten with Glenn Frey and featured prominently in the TV show Miami Vice in the ’80s.

    WHAT ARE YOU LISTENING TO?
    1. “My friend Meiko was the bartender at the Hotel Cafe in Hollywood, where I hang out. I didn’t know she was such a great songwriter and performer until I got her new album Meiko, which is a hit on the iTunes store.”
    2. “Fishtank Ensemble is a band with a gypsy violinist. They’re an amazing group, unlike most anything I’ve ever heard. I’ve been playing their Samurai over Serbia album.”
    3. “The Phantom Blues Band, featuring the incredible Mike Finnigan on vocals, recorded one of my songs on their album Out of the Shadows, which is great. They’re also the backup band for Taj Mahal.”
    4. “Joe Sublett’s new solo album, Subtones, is instrumental and perfect for when you want to set a mood. He plays saxophone with the Rolling Stones and everybody else.”
    5. “My longtime friend J.D. Souther has a new album called If the World Was You, and I can’t get enough of the song ‘I’ll Be Here at Closing Time.’ ”

    WHAT ARE YOU READING?
    1. “The Shock Doctrine by Naomi Klein is a fantastic book. It tells how to recognize the three prongs of the corporate-devil’s pitchfork. One, eliminate all public services, like parks, beaches, [and] health care. Two, deregulate all business. Three, privatize everything, from toll roads to the water supply. This leads to people being either very rich or very poor and the end of democracy and freedom.”
    2. “A Princess of Mars is a great pulp fantasy by Edgar Rice Burroughs, the writer of the Tarzan books. If you have an iPhone, you can download it and thousands of other books free and read them on your iPhone with the free Stanza program.”
    3. “The Dumarest of Terra series is perhaps my favorite pulp science-fiction books of all time. The series consists of 32 books by E.C. Tubb that almost no one knows about. The more you read them, the better they get!”
    4. “The Outfit by Richard Stark is part of the Parker book series. The movie Payback and five other films have been made from the Parker books. The main character is a very bad person. You wouldn’t want to meet him, but he’s great to read about.”
    5. “The Golden Section: Nature’s Greatest Secret by Scott Olsen is about a mathematical relationship known to everyone from Pythagoras to Leonardo da Vinci. This relationship appears everywhere in nature, and the book claims that it’s the secret of everything. It contains the ultimate mumbo and jumbo, except it’s all math, and it’s all true.”

    LENNON OR McCARTNEY?
    “Lennon credited McCartney with writing almost all the songs. They were both great on their own, but neither they nor anyone else ever achieved anything close to what they did together.”

    DRINK OF CHOICE?
    “PG Tips tea with heavy cream.”

    SOMETHING ABOUT YOU FEW KNOW ABOUT?
    “When no one is around and I straighten up, I am very tall. When people are around, I slouch down, to make them more comfortable.”

    Always in our hearts, Never forgotten

  7. #7
    Administrator sodascouts's Avatar
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    Default Re: Jack Tempchin

    Tempchin's got a show coming up:

    Time: January 5, 2009 9:00PM
    Location: Dublin Square, 554 Fourth Ave, San Diego, California 92101

    And... best of all...

    It's FREE!

    Always in our hearts, Never forgotten

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Jack Tempchin

    Another article:

    Eagles Songwriter Emerges with New Album

    Eagles songwriter Jack Tempchin may hold the rare distinction of being able to write a song over the telephone based on someone else's dream. That's what happened when he wrote the ballad 'Box of Memories,' with keyboardist Bobby Whitlock, about a girl and her possessions.

    "[Bobby] just started telling me the whole dream," Tempchin recalls to Spinner, "and I was writing it down. Everything in the song is absolutely from his dream. By the end of the phone conversation we had written the song."

    It is indicative of Tempchin's talent: The San Diego-based artist penned two of the Eagles' most popular songs in the '70s: 'Peaceful Easy Feeling' and 'Already Gone.' He later co-wrote several of Eagles founder Glenn Frey's big solo hits in the '80s including 'Smuggler's Blues' and 'You Belong to the City.' But few probably know that Tempchin is also a singer who has recorded seven albums since 1977, including the recent 'Songs,' his first work of original material in 12 years.

    "I've always been performing but I never really emphasized that part of my career," Tempchin, 61, says. "I just made this album and I realized if people don't know who you are, they can't come to the show."

    Songs contains eclectic styles including rock, romantic Parisian pop, country and Latin influences. Along with 'Box of Memories,' it features Tempchin's rendition of 'Smuggler's Blues,' which was originally recorded by Glenn Frey from 1983. "Towards the end of the album I realized I hadn't done any of the hits that I've written," says Tempchin. "I think it's still means just as much, if not more, in a whole world that's just going the wrong way on drug control."

    The friendship with Frey began around the time Tempchin was playing the San Diego coffeehouses during the folk era. "[He and J.D. Souther] used to stay with me at my big house down in San Diego with a lot of hippies living there," Tempchin recalls. His biggest break came in the early '70s when he wrote 'Peaceful Easy Feeling,' inspired by his attempt to get a waitress's attention at a coffeehouse in El Centro.

    "She went home and I ended up sleeping on the floor of the [place]," he says. "I wrote the first verse there. I came back to San Diego and met some other girls and I put them in the song. There was a Wienerschnitzel on Washington Boulevard, and I remember walking with my little $13 Stella guitar and writing the last verse."

    He was visiting Jackson Browne's home when Frey dropped in. Tempchin performed the song he wrote for Frey's tape recorder. "[Glenn] came back the next day and said, 'Well, Jack, I got a new band. We've been together for eight days, and we just worked up your song.' Then he played it for me on the cassette [player]. He went to England and recorded [the Eagles] first album."

    When the Eagles broke up in the early '80s, Frey collaborated with Tempchin for most of his solo career. Tempchin recalls a time when he came over to Frey's house where there was candlelight and a bottle of wine. "Glenn had a way of romancing a song," he says. "Then we hit an idea and all of a sudden, 'Whammo! Wow that's good!' I learned a lot about songwriting from him."

    In the late '90s, Jay-Z and Coolio sampled 'You Belong to the City' and 'Smuggler's Blues' for their songs, respectively. "It was a pretty big thrill," Tempchin says with a chuckle, "to see my music re-circulated, although in a really different form. That feels pretty good."

    Tempchin is still actively writing: his most recent composing credits are on the Eagles' last album 'Long Road Out of Eden.' He's been performing on the West Coast and hanging out at the Hotel Café, a music place in Los Angeles. "It's kind of like the early Troubadour bar scene over there," he says. "I'm so thankful to be back in the music scene where everyone is just into the music."

    Always in our hearts, Never forgotten

  9. #9
    Moderator Brooke's Avatar
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    Default Re: Jack Tempchin

    That was very interesting. Thanks Soda.

    What a talented man! It's just amazing to me how all these people knew each other back in the late 60's and 70's.
    https://i.imgur.com/CuSdAQM.jpg
    "They will never forget you 'till somebody new comes along"
    1948-2016 Gone but not forgotten

  10. #10
    Stuck on the Border Prettymaid's Avatar
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    Default Re: Jack Tempchin

    Love the part about Peaceful Easy Feeling.
    ~ Cathy ~

    And I dream I'm on vacation 'Cause I like the way that sounds,
    It's a perfect occupation for me.

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