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Thread: Pink Floyd

  1. #51
    Stuck on the Border Jonny Come Lately's Avatar
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    Default Re: Pink Floyd

    Thanks for the clarification about the writing of Stay. I love to know exactly who contributed what to each song.

    I totally agree about Waters and Gilmour being extremely complementary. I think there was a quote from The Wall-era (I think it was from Mark Blake's Pigs Might Fly) where Roger said 'we make a great team'. The Wall would not have existed, let alone be the epic it is, without Roger, but David added so much to the album with his vocals and guitars. Indeed, I'd say their vocals were every bit as complementary as their contributions to the rest of the music - Comfortably Numb and Hey You, for instance, would not have worked as well with just one of them singing the whole song. FWIW, I listened to Gilmour's first solo album last week - I really like most of it musically, but the lyrics and songs for the most part can't touch the Floyd albums recorded in the same era (in fairness, I'd add that little music can...)

    Just wondering, is it possible that Waters wrote all of the music for Time, and that Gilmour and Wright were credited for the Breathe (Reprise) section? I'd agree that Nick was probably credited for the famous drum introduction. I fully agree with you about David's performance on Time - the guitar solo is absolutely brilliant and a standout moment even by his standards.

    I more or less agree with you on the 'golden era' for PF except that I personally think it started in 1971 and ended in 1980. I feel that Echoes was where it all came together for the first time, while I would extend it to 1980 simply to include The Wall tour. Obscured By Clouds prevents it from being sequence of truly great albums, but I think it's a pretty enjoyable release in itself (and especially not bad given that I believe the whole thing was made in a couple of weeks), and 1972 did bring Live At Pompeii, which I absolutely love. In fact, this summer I actually went to Pompeii and visited the amphitheatre where the film was recorded and sat down, and listened to the full studio version of Echoes. I think I will remember that experience for many years.

    I get what you are saying about Syd Barrett - I do really love Astronomy Domine and there a few others of his that I really like (Lucifer Sam and Jugband Blues spring to mind), but I think there is a tendency to overrate his work with the band due to his mental breakdown which curtailed his career, it could be said to be rather like the praise that is lavished on musicians who died young like Hendrix, Jim Morrison and others. I will happily admit that I don't listen to The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn as often as I listen to Atom Heart Mother or Obscured By Clouds, neither of which garners anywhere near the same level of acclaim, but I get more enjoyment from hearing them.

    I'm glad to hear that you like The Endless River, I like it too but on starting to begin to wonder if I was alone. I tend to listen to it as a complete album from start to first, although my favourites as individual songs are It's What We Do and Surfacing. I also really like Talkin' Hawkin', which is funny as I'm not a great fan of Keep Talking, which is my least favourite from The Division Bell. I have to say I do quite like Louder Than Words, it's not great lyrically but it does fit the rest of the album musically. One thing I will admit though is that a lot of the references to earlier or more obscure Floyd works, such as the rather A Saucerful Of Secrets-like drumming on Skins, were probably lost on a lot of casual fans.

  2. #52
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    Default Re: Pink Floyd

    For me Endless River definitely works best as a complete album.

    As for Stay, has it been confirmed by a member, or is it a generally accepted assumption based on the official credit, that Roger wrote (all) the words? The KISS world is full of assumptions that have become "facts" (especially when it comes to "who played what" stuff), so I've become a bit sceptical about everything.

  3. #53
    Border Desperado MortSahlFan's Avatar
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    Default Re: Pink Floyd

    Couldn't agree more.. There is a tendency to have a romanticism with those who die early, or go crazy. It allows us to live and appreciate what others endure, without necessarily going through it ourselves, as we're still living.

    I also agree with "Echoes" - and almost mentioned "Meddle" but I guess I wanted to highlight the time where it was only Roger who wrote.

    Again, I've only listened to "Endless River" as a whole. I haven't even dragged it to my mp3 section, I can't divide it up. I did listen to a few Gilmour songs.

    Pros and Cons of Hitchhiking is a great album. I always wonder how Pink Floyd would have treated it.

  4. #54
    Stuck on the Border Jonny Come Lately's Avatar
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    Default Re: Pink Floyd

    Just thought I'd revive this thread by posting a link to a song from The Dark Side of the Moon I've just been listening to. In this sad time for all Borderers, I feel it is quite relevant.

    The Great Gig In The Sky

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T13se_2A7c8

    All of the songs on the album deal with the major issues and problems of the modern world (part of what makes this album so great is that these themes resonate over 40 years later), and Great Gig addresses mortality and a fear of dying. Although the song is probably best remembered for Clare Torry's wordless vocal, and the piano, it also features a spoken word section at the beginning, which I believe is from Gerry O'Driscoll, the doorman at the Abbey Road studios where the album was recorded.

    'I am not frightened of dying. Any time will do, I don't mind...'

    Previously when I had been listening to this song while thinking about life and death, I always thought of the song's writer, Floyd's late great keyboardist Rick Wright. However, this time I also thought of Glenn.

  5. #55
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    Default Re: Pink Floyd

    Dave Gilmour performing Comfortably Numb with Benedict Cumberbatch last month:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FaaoTvEdKtA
    "Billy, whoever writes the songs, wins."

  6. #56
    Stuck on the Border Jonny Come Lately's Avatar
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    Default Re: Pink Floyd

    This is a rather timely thread bump - it's now just six days until I see the Australian Pink Floyd Show in Manchester! (thanks too for posting the video, will give it a watch later). Was listening to a bit of P.U.L.S.E. today in anticipation. I'll try and post a brief review either here or (probably better) in the Concerts thread.

    What's strange is that I actually got tickets for this concert before I got my tickets to see Don, who I saw nearly four months ago! I'm quite lucky because their Manchester show is at the weekend, Liverpool would have been a lot easier to go to, but it's in the week when I'm away and can't go. I'm taking the opposite approach to the one I took with Don as I'm not reading reviews or set lists before the concert - I figure that I'm highly likely to recognise every song they'll play and I'd be prefer to be surprised! (by contrast with Don's show I found it helpful to find out what he was likely to play to give some idea of the flavour of the show, to know if he was doing any unusual covers or anything like, and to be able to know any songs my Dad wouldn't have recognised such as It Don't Matter To The Sun or I Don't Want To Hear Any More).
    Last edited by Jonny Come Lately; 10-23-2016 at 05:36 PM.

  7. #57
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    Default Re: Pink Floyd

    Okay, here’s my (not so brief) review of the Australian Pink Floyd show I saw on Saturday night! Here's the setlist:

    Astronomy Domine
    Shine On You Crazy Diamond (Parts I-V)
    Time/Breathe (Reprise)
    The Great Gig In The Sky
    On The Turning Away
    Wish You Were Here
    Us And Them
    Any Colour You Like
    Brain Damage
    Eclipse
    The Happiest Days Of Our Lives
    Another Brick In The Wall Part 2
    ---INTERMISSION---
    Pigs (Three Different Ones)
    Learning To Fly
    Hey You
    The Fletcher Memorial Home
    What Do You Want From Me
    Sorrow
    One Of These Days
    Encores:
    Comfortably Numb
    Run Like Hell

    It was a great setlist, with several surprises. It was quite funny to have a mix of songs from Animals and The Final Cut with those from Momentary Lapse and The Division Bell. I couldn't quite imagine Roger and David agreeing long enough to do that! Quite remarkably, they did not play Money! I’d assumed they were saving it for the encore. To be honest, it was only when they started Run Like Hell (which I knew would be the last song) that I realised they wouldn’t be doing it.

    Band lineup:
    http://www.aussiefloyd.com/the-band

    The two guitarists – Steve Mac and David Domminey Fowler – both mostly played Fender Stratocasters, the former’s ‘favourite axe’ was black whereas the latter’s was cream. I was surprised when I found out they had a dedicated singer, who didn’t play any instruments save for acoustic guitar on Comfortably Numb. This seemed unusual for a Pink Floyd based show, but worked surprisingly well (he was off stage for the longer instrumental sections). They also had a saxophone player who only played on two tracks.

    The only thing I did know in advance was that they would start with Astronomy Domine. This was great. It sounded most like the PULSE version, but had the mellow organ part in the middle like the Ummagumma version. Even better was to follow as the next song was Shine On You Crazy Diamond. As you probably know I absolutely love this song and it was great to hear the intro riff to part 2 (quite possibly my favourite bit of music, ever). Shine On had a video of a boy and a girl in a field and also photos of Syd. During the chorus they also showed an adapted version of the Wish You Were Here album cover with a pink kangaroo shaking hands with. The image disappeared and the sax player then came on stage.

    This was a very difficult song to follow up, but Time was every bit as good. Like the main singer sung on the verses, the bassist on the chorus like David and Rick on the original. The guitar solo on Time was absolutely spot on! Spine-tingling stuff. I think it was probably my favourite performance of the night. Next was Great Gig In The Sky, and another very fine rendition. All three backing singers had parts on the screaming/wailing, and a great little film featuring ocean waves and photos of Rick Wright added more to the performance.

    On The Turning Away isn’t really a favourite of mine – Pink Floyd and power ballads don’t mix well for me – but they did a pretty good job with it. I was a bit bemused by the intro to the next bit, which had film and audio clips of AC/DC, Kylie Minogue and Skippy the Kangaroo amongst others – the references were all clearly ‘Australian’ but it only then clicked that this meant the next song would be Wish You Were Here. I have to say that although they did it quite well, I think most of the other performances were a lot more impressive – because it was acoustic it was a bit more obvious than with most others that it wasn’t Pink Floyd themselves, I guess. Still very enjoyable though!

    It was a return to Dark Side with Us And Them, which was a great performance. This was immediately followed by Any Colour You Like. This was more like the record and PULSE than the more bluesy extended jams of the mid-70s performances. This too flowed straight into Brain Damage. The video for this song featured both of the US presidential candidates (including a quite brilliant bit showing Trump on a golf course set to ‘the lunatic is on the grass’!) and also deserves a shout for a clip showing piles of tabloid newspapers. I think Don H would have liked this part!

    They then introduced Another Brick by saying they were playing a song about school and teachers (it was obvious which song they meant, but I joked that they were going to play Welcome To The Machine!) I was delighted that they played Happiest Days in full as an intro, and even better they had a film during Happiest Days and Another Brick showed CGI animated versions of Pink, the teacher and the other schoolchildren based on Gerald Scarfe’s original animation. Overall it was most similar to The Wall tour version, but there were some similarities with PULSE; the backing singers sung the second verse. Uniquely, the lead guitar player used a Les Paul for the main guitar solo, not a Strat. Then went into an organ solo and then another guitar solo to end. The only slight shame was that it didn’t feature the teacher shouting ‘Wrong! Do it again!’ and the other bits at the end.

    There was then a 15 minute interval. Me and my Dad both predicted that the first song after the intermission would be One Of These Days. We were very surprised when it turned out to be Pigs (3 Different Ones)! Interestingly, the main singer did the first part of each verse up to the second ‘ha ha charade you are’, then the bassist sung the rest of each verse. The song featured the talk box solo like the original record, and the middle section (my favourite part of the song) and final solo were immense.

    Then came Learning To Fly, which I was impressed by – that song has only started to grow on me recently, but I really enjoyed their rendition. Next was The Fletcher Memorial Home. The guitar solo was great, but the vocals were even better, the singer really sounded like Roger in the way he veered from a quiet voice to an almost manically intense one. It was quite funny to hear this very Roger Waters track being immediately followed by two of the later Gilmour era songs, What Do You Want From Me and Sorrow. The latter was particularly good, to me the song itself isn’t that great but the guitar work is and that aspect of it meant it worked well live. On One Of These Days, they showed the bassist playing the one-note bass line on the big screen, which I thought was cool. In the background, a giant pink kangaroo (seriously, it was massive!) was inflated which spoke the threat just as the pig appears to do on Delicate Sound of Thunder, and then bounced up and down during the rest of the song. They had lap steel as played by Gilmour in the 1980s and 90s. It was a great end to the regular set ahead of the two encores.

    The first encore was Comfortably Numb. What can I can say? Those guitar solos… wow! David would have been proud. They did a much better job with the verse vocals than the post-Waters Floyd did too. Next up, as on the PULSE live album, was Run Like Hell. I’ve always found it to be terrific live and I took great pleasure in chanting ‘run, run, run, run!’ Luckily everyone else was singing, so hopefully no one had to hear my awful, awful singing voice. The vocals were shared as with The Wall tour, Delicate Sound and PULSE versions.

    Overall it was a fantastic evening! The music, the band and the show were spectacular. It was a long set – they played for 3 hours with just a short break. It was also unique for me so far as it was the first big production rock show I’d seen. Of the only other two rock concerts I’ve been to, neither Don nor Neil Young had anything much in the way of videos, pyrotechnics or special effects. I really would recommend going to see them if you’re Floyd fan, it was a truly inspired salute to a great band. I didn't even hear anyone shout 'play Money!'

  8. #58
    Stuck on the Border NightMistBlue's Avatar
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    Default Re: Pink Floyd

    Has anyone here visited the Victoria & Albert Museum's exhibition on Pink Floyd? It's called Their Mortal Remains. Looks rather nice. https://www.vam.ac.uk/exhibitions/pink-floyd

  9. #59
    Stuck on the Border Dawn's Avatar
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    Default Re: Pink Floyd

    Quote Originally Posted by NightMistBlue View Post
    Has anyone here visited the Victoria & Albert Museum's exhibition on Pink Floyd? It's called Their Mortal Remains. Looks rather nice. https://www.vam.ac.uk/exhibitions/pink-floyd
    No, but I would love to check it out because I love PF and the exhibit looks amazing!!! Thanks!!

  10. #60
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    Default Re: Pink Floyd

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonny Come Lately View Post
    Okay, here’s my (not so brief) review of the Australian Pink Floyd show I saw on Saturday night! Here's the setlist:

    Astronomy Domine
    Shine On You Crazy Diamond (Parts I-V)
    Time/Breathe (Reprise)
    The Great Gig In The Sky
    On The Turning Away
    Wish You Were Here
    Us And Them
    Any Colour You Like
    Brain Damage
    Eclipse
    The Happiest Days Of Our Lives
    Another Brick In The Wall Part 2
    ---INTERMISSION---
    Pigs (Three Different Ones)
    Learning To Fly
    Hey You
    The Fletcher Memorial Home
    What Do You Want From Me
    Sorrow
    One Of These Days
    Encores:
    Comfortably Numb
    Run Like Hell

    It was a great setlist, with several surprises. It was quite funny to have a mix of songs from Animals and The Final Cut with those from Momentary Lapse and The Division Bell. I couldn't quite imagine Roger and David agreeing long enough to do that! Quite remarkably, they did not play Money! I’d assumed they were saving it for the encore. To be honest, it was only when they started Run Like Hell (which I knew would be the last song) that I realised they wouldn’t be doing it.

    Band lineup:
    http://www.aussiefloyd.com/the-band

    The two guitarists – Steve Mac and David Domminey Fowler – both mostly played Fender Stratocasters, the former’s ‘favourite axe’ was black whereas the latter’s was cream. I was surprised when I found out they had a dedicated singer, who didn’t play any instruments save for acoustic guitar on Comfortably Numb. This seemed unusual for a Pink Floyd based show, but worked surprisingly well (he was off stage for the longer instrumental sections). They also had a saxophone player who only played on two tracks.

    The only thing I did know in advance was that they would start with Astronomy Domine. This was great. It sounded most like the PULSE version, but had the mellow organ part in the middle like the Ummagumma version. Even better was to follow as the next song was Shine On You Crazy Diamond. As you probably know I absolutely love this song and it was great to hear the intro riff to part 2 (quite possibly my favourite bit of music, ever). Shine On had a video of a boy and a girl in a field and also photos of Syd. During the chorus they also showed an adapted version of the Wish You Were Here album cover with a pink kangaroo shaking hands with. The image disappeared and the sax player then came on stage.

    This was a very difficult song to follow up, but Time was every bit as good. Like the main singer sung on the verses, the bassist on the chorus like David and Rick on the original. The guitar solo on Time was absolutely spot on! Spine-tingling stuff. I think it was probably my favourite performance of the night. Next was Great Gig In The Sky, and another very fine rendition. All three backing singers had parts on the screaming/wailing, and a great little film featuring ocean waves and photos of Rick Wright added more to the performance.

    On The Turning Away isn’t really a favourite of mine – Pink Floyd and power ballads don’t mix well for me – but they did a pretty good job with it. I was a bit bemused by the intro to the next bit, which had film and audio clips of AC/DC, Kylie Minogue and Skippy the Kangaroo amongst others – the references were all clearly ‘Australian’ but it only then clicked that this meant the next song would be Wish You Were Here. I have to say that although they did it quite well, I think most of the other performances were a lot more impressive – because it was acoustic it was a bit more obvious than with most others that it wasn’t Pink Floyd themselves, I guess. Still very enjoyable though!

    It was a return to Dark Side with Us And Them, which was a great performance. This was immediately followed by Any Colour You Like. This was more like the record and PULSE than the more bluesy extended jams of the mid-70s performances. This too flowed straight into Brain Damage. The video for this song featured both of the US presidential candidates (including a quite brilliant bit showing Trump on a golf course set to ‘the lunatic is on the grass’!) and also deserves a shout for a clip showing piles of tabloid newspapers. I think Don H would have liked this part!

    They then introduced Another Brick by saying they were playing a song about school and teachers (it was obvious which song they meant, but I joked that they were going to play Welcome To The Machine!) I was delighted that they played Happiest Days in full as an intro, and even better they had a film during Happiest Days and Another Brick showed CGI animated versions of Pink, the teacher and the other schoolchildren based on Gerald Scarfe’s original animation. Overall it was most similar to The Wall tour version, but there were some similarities with PULSE; the backing singers sung the second verse. Uniquely, the lead guitar player used a Les Paul for the main guitar solo, not a Strat. Then went into an organ solo and then another guitar solo to end. The only slight shame was that it didn’t feature the teacher shouting ‘Wrong! Do it again!’ and the other bits at the end.

    There was then a 15 minute interval. Me and my Dad both predicted that the first song after the intermission would be One Of These Days. We were very surprised when it turned out to be Pigs (3 Different Ones)! Interestingly, the main singer did the first part of each verse up to the second ‘ha ha charade you are’, then the bassist sung the rest of each verse. The song featured the talk box solo like the original record, and the middle section (my favourite part of the song) and final solo were immense.

    Then came Learning To Fly, which I was impressed by – that song has only started to grow on me recently, but I really enjoyed their rendition. Next was The Fletcher Memorial Home. The guitar solo was great, but the vocals were even better, the singer really sounded like Roger in the way he veered from a quiet voice to an almost manically intense one. It was quite funny to hear this very Roger Waters track being immediately followed by two of the later Gilmour era songs, What Do You Want From Me and Sorrow. The latter was particularly good, to me the song itself isn’t that great but the guitar work is and that aspect of it meant it worked well live. On One Of These Days, they showed the bassist playing the one-note bass line on the big screen, which I thought was cool. In the background, a giant pink kangaroo (seriously, it was massive!) was inflated which spoke the threat just as the pig appears to do on Delicate Sound of Thunder, and then bounced up and down during the rest of the song. They had lap steel as played by Gilmour in the 1980s and 90s. It was a great end to the regular set ahead of the two encores.

    The first encore was Comfortably Numb. What can I can say? Those guitar solos… wow! David would have been proud. They did a much better job with the verse vocals than the post-Waters Floyd did too. Next up, as on the PULSE live album, was Run Like Hell. I’ve always found it to be terrific live and I took great pleasure in chanting ‘run, run, run, run!’ Luckily everyone else was singing, so hopefully no one had to hear my awful, awful singing voice. The vocals were shared as with The Wall tour, Delicate Sound and PULSE versions.

    Overall it was a fantastic evening! The music, the band and the show were spectacular. It was a long set – they played for 3 hours with just a short break. It was also unique for me so far as it was the first big production rock show I’d seen. Of the only other two rock concerts I’ve been to, neither Don nor Neil Young had anything much in the way of videos, pyrotechnics or special effects. I really would recommend going to see them if you’re Floyd fan, it was a truly inspired salute to a great band. I didn't even hear anyone shout 'play Money!'
    Wow, thanks for the indepth review sounds like quite a show! Glad you could go!

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