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Thread: Eagles Mentions in the Press

  1. #71
    Stuck on the Border
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    Default Re: Eagles Mentions in the Press

    Sorry Dreamer, I did not see WC's post when I posted my two cents...... Makes more sense now. That group should have known about the license requirement. Don gave them to Ok to perform HC but they changed it to Led Zep. I fell bad for all those people who purchased tickets for the show. Hopefully they can reschedule it for a later date.

  2. #72
    Administrator sodascouts's Avatar
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    Default Re: Eagles Mentions in the Press

    So apparently the guy in charge of this just brazenly made up bald-faced lies about the Eagles and Azoff and emailed them to disappointed customers to cover his own mistake. Nice.

    What a loser.

    Always in our hearts, Never forgotten

  3. #73
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    Default Re: Eagles Mentions in the Press

    Quote Originally Posted by sodascouts View Post
    So apparently the guy in charge of this just brazenly made up bald-faced lies about the Eagles and Azoff and emailed them to disappointed customers to cover his own mistake. Nice.

    What a loser.
    It sure seems that way. The sad thing is everyone will know about the claim to pay $10k per song and few will hear/know that was not true.

  4. #74
    Stuck on the Border WalshFan88's Avatar
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    Default Re: Eagles Mentions in the Press

    Hmm. As Dreamer said, the truth is probably in the middle. I can definitely see Azoff being greedy (an understatement if you ask me), but if that guy made that up, he's a loser, as Soda stated.

  5. #75
    Stuck on the Border NightMistBlue's Avatar
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    Default Re: Eagles Mentions in the Press

    Speaking of Azoff, here's a recent article about him. It's a bit too fawning and I wish they hadn't used the title of Randy's song (even Glenn called it Randy's song!) but that's just me.
    http://v1.hitsdailydouble.com/rainma...qMsEYniRHKIz7c

  6. #76
    Administrator sodascouts's Avatar
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    Default Re: Eagles Mentions in the Press

    Quote Originally Posted by NightMistBlue View Post
    Speaking of Azoff, here's a recent article about him. It's a bit too fawning and I wish they hadn't used the title of Randy's song (even Glenn called it Randy's song!) but that's just me.
    http://v1.hitsdailydouble.com/rainma...qMsEYniRHKIz7c
    Thanks for that. There is a bit about Glenn's death buried in there:
    "'Azoff was devastated by the death of Frey in January 2016. 'Glenn Frey was a huge business, music, and golf influence on me,' he told us. 'It’s like losing a broth-er. It will never be the same. He was beloved by so many—and I don’t mean just industry people. He did so much, and he was a regular guy.' When asked about the key to the partnership of Glenn and Don, who seemed like such opposites yet complemented each other so beautifully, Irving responded, ' Mutual respect and knowing that they each brought something different to the table.'”

    I found the term "Golf influence" odd but still, overall, it was a very nice thing to say.

    Still, the fact that he has been dishonest in his dealings seems to come up in these interviews regularly, and it always astonishes me that he doesn't seem to be ashamed of that fact, nor does it seem to bother anyone else. Still, that confession was from 1978. Perhaps since then, he has changed his ways.

    Always in our hearts, Never forgotten

  7. #77
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    Default Re: Eagles Mentions in the Press

    Not sure if this article from January has been previously posted, but it's nice to see Rolling Stone say some nice things about our Eagles
    https://www.rollingstone.com/music/m...a-1976-779890/

  8. #78
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    Default Re: Eagles Mentions in the Press

    Thanks MarthaJo - and I agree that there aren't normally that many kudos for the band from Rolling Stone. I was actually surprised that I agreed with many of their choices, although not necessarily the order of them. But, it's Rolling Stone so you had to know that there would be a few weird choices in the mix - I mean Disco Strangler, Greeks, and Most of Us Are Sad instead of Seven Bridges Road, Get Over It, or Waiting In the Weeds - REALLY?

    The poll isn't that far off from the one we did here on the Border on the band's 40th anniversary year. Both polls are unscientific opinions, so it's impossible to get 100% agreement for sure. For those of you who weren't around then, here's the link to our poll if you're interested ...

    http://eaglesonlinecentral.com/forum...th+anniversary

    "People don't run out of dreams: People just run out of time ..."
    Glenn Frey 11/06/1948 - 01/18/2016

  9. #79
    Administrator sodascouts's Avatar
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    Default Re: Eagles Mentions in the Press

    Apparently, several master tapes of the Eagles and Don Henley were destroyed in a fire several years back at UMG:

    --------------------------
    The Day the Music Burned


    "The archive in Building 6197 was UMG’s main West Coast storehouse of masters, the original recordings from which all subsequent copies are derived. A master is a one-of-a-kind artifact, the irreplaceable primary source of a piece of recorded music. According to UMG documents, the vault held analog tape masters dating back as far as the late 1940s, as well as digital masters of more recent vintage. It held multitrack recordings, the raw recorded materials — each part still isolated, the drums and keyboards and strings on separate but adjacent areas of tape — from which mixed or “flat” analog masters are usually assembled. And it held session masters, recordings that were never commercially released.

    UMG maintained additional tape libraries across the United States and around the world. But the label’s Vault Operations department was managed from the backlot, and the archive there housed some of UMG’s most prized material. [...] The vault held masters for the MCA, ABC, A&M, Geffen and Interscope labels. And it held masters for a host of smaller subsidiary labels. Nearly all of these masters — in some cases, the complete discographies of entire record labels — were wiped out in the fire.

    [...]

    The list of destroyed single and album masters takes in titles by dozens of legendary artists, a genre-spanning who’s who of 20th- and 21st-century popular music. It includes recordings by Benny Goodman, Cab Calloway, the Andrews Sisters, the Ink Spots, the Mills Brothers, Lionel Hampton, Ray Charles, Sister Rosetta Tharpe, Clara Ward, Sammy Davis Jr., Les Paul, Fats Domino, Big Mama Thornton, Burl Ives, the Weavers, Kitty Wells, Ernest Tubb, Lefty Frizzell, Loretta Lynn, George Jones, Merle Haggard, Bobby (Blue) Bland, B.B. King, Ike Turner, the Four Tops, Quincy Jones, Burt Bacharach, Joan Baez, Neil Diamond, Sonny and Cher, the Mamas and the Papas, Joni Mitchell, Captain Beefheart, Cat Stevens, the Carpenters, Gladys Knight and the Pips, Al Green, the Flying Burrito Brothers, Elton John, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Eric Clapton, Jimmy Buffett, the Eagles, Don Henley, Aerosmith, Steely Dan, Iggy Pop, Rufus and Chaka Khan, Barry White, Patti LaBelle, Yoko Ono, Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, the Police, Sting, George Strait, Steve Earle, R.E.M., Janet Jackson, Eric B. and Rakim, New Edition, Bobby Brown, Guns N’ Roses, Queen Latifah, Mary J. Blige, Sonic Youth, No Doubt, Nine Inch Nails, Snoop Dogg, Nirvana, Soundgarden, Hole, Beck, Sheryl Crow, Tupac Shakur, Eminem, 50 Cent and the Roots.

    [...]

    The vault fire was not, as UMG suggested, a minor mishap, a matter of a few tapes stuck in a musty warehouse. It was the biggest disaster in the history of the music business. UMG’s internal assessment of the event stands in contrast to its public statements. In a document prepared for a March 2009 “Vault Loss Meeting,” the company described the damage in apocalyptic terms. “The West Coast Vault perished, in its entirety,” the document read. “Lost in the fire was, undoubtedly, a huge musical heritage.”

    [...]

    It is sonic fidelity, first and foremost, that defines the importance of masters. “A master is the truest capture of a piece of recorded music,” said Adam Block, the former president of Legacy Recordings, Sony Music Entertainment’s catalog arm. “Sonically, masters can be stunning in their capturing of an event in time. Every copy thereafter is a sonic step away.”

    This is not an academic point. The recording industry is a business of copies; often as not, it’s a business of copies of copies of copies. A Spotify listener who clicks on a favorite old song may hear a file in a compressed audio format called Ogg Vorbis. That file was probably created by converting an MP3, which may have been ripped years earlier from a CD, which itself may have been created from a suboptimal “safety copy” of the LP master — or even from a dubbed duplicate of that dubbed duplicate. Audiophiles complain that the digital era, with its rampant copy-paste ethos and jumble of old and new formats, is an age of debased sound: lossy audio files created from nth-generation transfers; cheap vinyl reissues, marketed to analog-fetishists but pressed up from sludgy non-analog sources. “It’s the audio equivalent of the game of ‘Telephone,’ ” says Henry Sapoznik, a celebrated producer of historical compilation albums. “Who really would be satisfied with the sixth message in?”

    The remedy is straightforward: You go back to the master. This is one reason that rereleases of classic albums are promoted as having been painstakingly remastered from the original tapes. It’s why consumers of new technologies, like CDs in the 1980s, are eager to hear familiar music properly recaptured for the format. Right now, sound-savvy consumers are taking the next leap forward into high-resolution audio, which can deliver streaming music of unprecedented depth and detail. But you can’t simply up-convert existing digital files to higher resolution. You have to return to the master and recapture it at a higher bit rate.

    [...]

    That same [2008] June 3 Daily News article included a direct quotation from LoFrumento: “In one sense it was a loss. In another, we were covered,” he said. “It had already been digitized, so the music will still be around for many years.” The claim about digital backups, which was reported by other news outlets, also seems to have been misleading. It is true that UMG’s vault-operations department had begun a digitization initiative, known as the Preservation Project, in late 2004. But company documents, and testimony given by UMG officials in legal proceedings, make clear that the project was modest; records show that at the time of the fire approximately 12,000 tapes, mostly analog multitracks visibly at risk of deterioration, had been transferred to digital storage formats. All of those originals and digital copies were stored in a separate facility in Pennsylvania; they were not the items at issue in the fire. The company’s sweeping assurance that “the music” had been digitized appears to have been pure spin. “The company knew that there would be shock and outrage if people found out the real story,” Aronson says. “They did an outstanding job of keeping it quiet. It’s a secret I’m ashamed to have been a part of.”

    [...]

    Back in 2008, UMG undoubtedly feared the public embarrassment that news of the losses could bring. But Aronson and others suggest that UMG was especially concerned about repercussions with the artists, and the estates of artists, whose recordings were destroyed.

    Record contracts are notoriously slanted in the favor of labels, which benefit disproportionately from sales and, in most cases, hold ownership of masters. For decades, standard artists’ contracts stipulated that recordings were “work for hire,” with record companies retaining control of masters in perpetuity. It is a paradox of the record business: Labels have often been cavalier about physically safeguarding masters, but they are zealous guardians of their ownership and intellectual-property rights.

    Certain musicians, usually big stars, negotiate ownership of masters. (“If you don’t own your masters, your master owns you,” quipped Prince in 1996, at the height of a high-profile standoff with Warner Brothers.) It is unclear how many of the artists whose work was lost in the Universal vault had ownership of their physical masters, or were seeking it. But by definition, artists have a stake in the intellectual property contained on those masters, and many artists surely expected UMG to safeguard the material for potential later use. Had word of the fire’s toll emerged, many of the biggest names in pop music, and many profitable artist estates, would have learned that UMG had lost core documents their catalogs rest on — a source for everything from potentially lucrative reissues to historical preservation to posthumous releases. That scenario could have exposed UMG to a storm of questions, threats and reputational damage from across the industry.

    But in the decade since the fire, UMG has faced little apparent blowback from artists or their representatives. It is probable that musicians whose masters were destroyed have no idea that a vault holding UMG masters had burned down. (A UMG spokesperson, asked if there has been any systematic effort to inform artists of the losses, said the company “doesn’t publicly discuss our private conversations with artists and estates.”)

    --------------

    Due to UMG's coverup, it's possible the Eagles and Don don't even know some of their masters burned.

    Always in our hearts, Never forgotten

  10. #80
    Stuck on the Border Houston Baby's Avatar
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    Default Re: Eagles Mentions in the Press

    I hadn't heard of this. Really makes me sick to think about it. I think they are using the term "archive" and "vault" loosely as it sounds more like a warehouse. An archive or vault should be fireproof. What lunacy!!
    Such a sad, sad loss and one that could have been prevented IMO.

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